Choosing the Right Barbecue Grill

By Joseph Ferris



With all the different types and sizes of barbecues, today it may become difficult to choose the correct one that meets your needs. Size is one of the determining factors in the price of a barbecue as well as features and extra burners. This article will give you a fairly good idea what you can do with different types of barbecues and sizes.

Barbecue Size

490 square inches is enough to cook anywhere from 25 to 30 burgers at one time. This size falls into the medium to large group and is good if you are going to cook for a large group of people. 
350 square inches will cook approximately 15 burgers at one time and is usually sufficient for family gatherings.

Price

Barbecues priced under $500 are usually in the 350 to 600 square inch range. Barbecues in the high price range of $600 to $1,200 will often have a rotisserie burner and about 450 square inches to 850 square inches of total cooking surface.

Barbecue Burners

The heat output of a barbecue is measured in BTU's. The heat output will range from 25,000 to 60,000 BTU's. Keep in mind that 44,000 BTU's is consider hot and 60,000 BTU's is considered blazing hot. Side burners will range anywhere for 10,000 to 12,000 BTU's.

Gas Source

A gas barbecue can use either propane gas or natural gas. If you have access to natural gas it will eliminate the possibility of running out of propane gas during a barbecue. If natural gas is not available then you will need to fill and use the propane tank.

The Barbecue Cart

The barbecue cart may be made from stainless steel, cast aluminum or painted steel. Stainless steel is highly resistant to corrosion, painted steel will rust once it gets scratches, and cast aluminum is also highly resistant to rust. You also may want to consider storage compartments for your barbecue utensils and investing in a cover.

Extras

- If you are considering broiling foods on a rotisserie, be sure the barbecue you're shopping for has or will accommodate a rotisserie set. 
-The hood should have a temperature gauge for preheating the barbecue. 
-Consider a barbecue that has warming racks so you can keep your cooked food warm until it's ready to be served. 
-Invest in a cooking thermometer so you know when your meat is cooked. Most food thermometers come with a temperature cooking guide.



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